The sister of a disabled man who died after his be

Posted On Jul 31 2019 by

first_imgThe sister of a disabled man who died after his benefits were sanctioned has launched a campaign to persuade the attorney general to order an inquest into his death.Gill Thompson needs to raise £10, 000 to instruct lawyers, apply for the necessary records, and seek expert evidence relating to the death of her brother, David Clapson, in July 2013.Clapson (pictured) died from diabetic ketoacidosis, an acute lack of insulin, three weeks after having his benefits sanctioned.His electricity key had run out of credit because he had no money, so the fridge where he kept his insulin was not working.An autopsy found his stomach was empty, and the only food left in his flat was six tea bags, a tin of soup and an out-of-date can of sardines. He had just £3.44 left in his bank account.But despite the troubling circumstances surrounding his death, there has never been an inquest, while DWP has twice written to the family to insist that “no errors were made” in dealing with his case while he was alive.DWP has also admitted in a letter to his MP that it was aware that he relied on insulin.Thompson said she believed her brother was killed by the sanctions system, and added: “They are not going to give in. I have tried everything. I can’t bring David back, but I would like to be able to make a difference.“I thought that if I get an inquiry into the circumstances leading to David’s death through the sanctions I will show that what they are doing is having consequences.“I just don’t want any more deaths.”Clapson had previously worked for 30 years, including five years in the army, and recently as a carer for his mother, who had dementia, but had had his £71.70-a-week jobseeker’s allowance stopped for a month after he missed two meetings at his local jobcentre.CVs for job applications were found near his body, and he had been on work placements, passed a fork lift truck qualification and attended a computer training course.His sister said: “David was a quiet, private and proud man who never asked or wanted much; he never complained or told me or his friends he had been sanctioned.“He was not a ‘scrounger’ or ‘skiver’, he was simply unwell and vulnerable and needed caring support rather than being sanctioned without a lifeline.”She added: “I feel that by doing this I will have done something for David and for others. I don’t want anything from this but to make a difference.“If we said nothing, they would be getting away with it.”Merry Varney, from law firm Leigh Day, which is representing Thompson in her fight for an inquest, said: “Managing type one diabetes requires good nutrition and regular insulin injections.“Rendering a person unable to afford food and/or unable to chill their insulin is likely to have fatal consequences.“David’s death must be investigated to make sure safeguards are in place to protect others and to establish whether the DWP knowingly cut off David’s lifeline.”Thompson launched her fundraising campaign just a day before Disability News Service (DNS) was due to ask a tribunal to force the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to publish information from secret “peer reviews” it has carried out into the deaths of 49 benefit claimants.Thompson, like other families who have lost relatives in benefit-related circumstances, has no idea whether DWP carried out a peer review into her brother’s death.She has backed efforts to force DWP to release the information, and said: “I think the families have a right to know the truth.”DNS is appealing against the refusal of the Information Commissioner’s Office to require DWP to release details from the reports.The hearing took place in London today (3 March) in front of the First-Tier Tribunal (Information Rights), although a decision is not expected for several months.Next week, Thompson will hand DWP an online petition of more than 211,000 signatures, calling for an independent inquiry into the government’s benefit sanctions regime.A protest to mark the handover will take place at DWP’s Caxton House headquarters, in Tothill Street, London SW1H 9NA, from 2.30-4pm on Wednesday (9 March).last_img read more


The health and social care secretary appears to ha

Posted On Jul 31 2019 by

first_imgThe health and social care secretary appears to have ruled out sweeping changes to the funding system for adult social care.Matt Hancock, giving evidence about the adult social care funding crisis to a House of Lords committee on Tuesday (pictured), told peers that he saw a “series of injustices” in the system but was “more attracted to options that build and directly improve on the system than ripping the whole thing up and starting from scratch”.He hadearlier confirmed to the Lords economic affairs committee, which is conductingan inquiry into the funding of social care in England, that the government’sgreen paper had been delayed yet again due to the parliamentary Brexit crisis.TheDepartment of Health and Social Care (DHSC) originally promised that the greenpaper would be published by the end of 2017, and then July last year, beforedelaying it to the autumn and then the end of 2018.After missing the December 2018deadline, it wasdelayed until “the earliest opportunity” in 2019, before Hancock told MPs itwould be published by April.Now thatdeadline has been missed as well, and Hancock said he could only promise thatit was “coming in due course”.He added: “Iwish that the green paper had been published by now and we are continuing towork on it in the department because this is such an important issue and alongstanding policy problem that needs to be tackled.”He alsoruled out proposals that would change the system to one that was solely fundednationally, with no financing by local authorities, saying: “I don’t agree withthat.”And hesuggested that the green paper – when it was finally published – was unlikelyto include a definitive plan for how he believed adult social care fundingshould be reformed.He said:“What I would like to do is bring forward a green paper that can bring togetherthe debate, because it does have to be cross-party, and bring that debatebehind a direction of travel where we can make progress.”But he didstress to the committee that the funding crisis affected both working-ageadults and children, as well as older people, pointing out – as many politiciansfail to do – that about 50 per cent of local authority funding in this area isspent on working-age adult social care.And he alsosaid he wanted to see more funding for home-based support, rather thanresidential care.He said: “Ithink there’s a big difference and a big opportunity to make social carebetter, better for the individual being cared for and better value for money,by a shift from residential to domiciliary care.“Domiciliarycare is cheaper than residential care. People want to stay at home for as longas possible.”He added:“That sort of thing is much easier to fix than the long-term ‘who’s going topay for it?’ and that will get a mention in the green paper no doubt.”He acceptedthat there was often a financial incentive for councils to place older anddisabled people into residential care because it can allow the local authorityto take account of a family home as a financial asset when deciding how muchthe person should pay towards their care, which it cannot do if they remain intheir own home.He toldpeers: “What we do know is that more people go into residential care than isclinically justified and that domiciliary care is on average… better as well asbeing better value for money.”Hancock saidthat “taxpayer” funding would “inevitably be part of the solution” but that hebelieved it was “impossible” to put an “exact figure” on how much would beneeded, and that he could not confirm that there would be an increase intaxpayer funding for the system because of the government’s forthcomingspending review.He said thegovernment had put an extra £10 billion into social care over the last threeyears, while its spending was £3.9 billion higher this year in real terms thanin 2015-16, a nine per cent real terms increase.Two yearsago, the UN’s committee on the rights of persons with disabilities warned the UK was “going backwards”on independent living,and called on the government to draw up a “comprehensive plan” to address theproblem, and to take “urgent action” to ensure disabled people were providedwith “adequate support to live independent lives”.A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more


Artist Remembered as Fierce Fighter Against Leukemia

Posted On Jul 31 2019 by

first_img Tags: arts Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% (Martha Rodriguez was featured in this 2014 Mission Local video about open studios) 0% After a years-long battle with leukemia, artist Martha A. Rodriguez died on Tuesday, July 5 at 62 years of age. Her vibrant paintings often reflected her struggle with cancer and her desire to continue fighting it. Rodriguez painted and sculpted at her “Estudio Martita,” a workspace inside 1890 Bryant Street studios. Her work examined life, death, and womanhood, often depicting robust, larger women as an expression of powerful femininity. Throughout her second bout with the cancer, Rodriguez continued to send messages of gratitude and wrote to friends about her desire to live in the present and enjoy the time she had left. She continued to create art even during a stay in a Seattle hospital, including a work entitled “Determination.”“Determination” by Martha A. RodriguezBird Levy, a curator, remembered Rodriguez as a gracious professional, who never quibbled over sales but was always ready to contribute pieces to the annual Pasión de Frida exhibition at Puerto Alegre on Valencia Street. “She just wasn’t ready to leave them and I just can’t say enough about her fierce fierce fight that she put up,” Levy said. “She will always be an inspiration to me every day.”Maria Sanchez, who runs the gallery Sanchez Contemporary in Oakland, had known Rodriguez for some 12 years. Two of Rodriguez’ works are currently on display at the gallery, and Sanchez has set up a small memorial space for people to share memories and grieve.“She was a warrior, she was so brave. If there’s anything she taught me it’s to be brave no matter what circumstances you face in life, and to have compassion not just for other people but for yourself,” Sanchez said.But throughout her battle, Rodriguez remained bright and open. “I can’t tell you how inspiring and strong she was,” Levy said. “[She] always showed up with her red lipstick and her smile on her face even though I knew she had just had a chemo treatment or some other invasive awful thing.”Doreen Villanuevas, Rodriguez’ college roommate at the University of California at Santa Barbara, saw her as an inspiration.“She made a difference in my life just to work harder in what I did, and to not to feel sorry for myself,” Villanuevas said. “I had lost my job. After looking at what she was going through I had no reason to complain.”Rodriguez was from San Jose but a resident of San Francisco for many years. She attended the University of California at Santa Barbara and later University of California at Berkeley, where she earned a degree in Social Welfare. After earning her degree, Rodriguez went on to work in public health to research the causes and effects of HIV. Villanuevas remembered her insistence on being well dressed and her dedication to social and cultural work.“The way I always remember Martha is we always had to dress up, even though we were in college, and she would kind of get on my case about being a little sloppy,” Villanuevas said. “I always remember her being that way with us, always in a good mood good spirit, never upset about really a lot of anything. When I ran into her again [later] she was the same, she hadn’t lost it, she was genuine.”Later in her life, classic red lipstick was one of Rodriguez’ hallmarks – Diana Gaspar-Pena remembered a  conversation with the painter and sculptor about that particular bit of flair.“It’s passion, you know?” Gaspar-Pena said. “We talked about it one time and she said… She didn’t want to be a shrinking violet. It’s like, you know, here I am. Red.” Gaspar-Pena also saw Rodriguez’ earliest expressions of her social consciousness, attending high school walk-outs and rallies for farm workers with her. “She still was very gregarious, she always just had a really good attitude,” Gaspar-Pena said. Rodriguez’s postings on Facebook demonstrated this attitude. On June 13, she wrote:  “World events continue to happen, the good, bad and very ugly. I continue to sit in my hospital room effected by fevers that come and go and come back again. I have no control. My personal tolerance for this latest treatment has been tested. Doctor says the worst of the car t Cell side effects may be yet to come. While world events continue, the Syrian war, the IRA KILLING of AMERICAN adults and children, I’m housed in a bubble. This is what I’ve been given: to be an advocate for my disease, Leukemia. Perhaps if I can get through this I can find those issues close to my heart.”Rodriguez’s posts could be just as exuberant about the everyday wonders of life. A few weeks earlier, she posted photographs of Seattle views and exclaimed; “This is what I woke up to this morning- SUNSHINE in Seattle. It’s kind of breathtaking!”Villanuevas also remembered Rodriguez’ early efforts to be civically engaged. She and another classmate by the same name ran for student council as “the Marthas.” Naturally, they won.“We were always, as Chicanas, trying to do something to better the community,” Villanuevas said. And throughout her illness, Rodriquez reminded friends to visit an exhibition or to support a fellow artist’s show. Rodriguez kept in touch with friends and family with frequent updates about her condition and her state of mind. She and her friends, many of them also Latina women artists, kept each other going. “We would keep in touch with each other and just keep each other motivated,” Gaspar-Pena said. “It’s tough to be an artist.”In late May, Rodriguez wrote an email update for her friends.“Your wishes of love, light, health, prayers are so welcomed. I have been surrounded by your love,” she wrote. “You have all given me strength, a meaning for a my life and a powerful desire to stay with the living – for as long as I can.” last_img read more


Owner of San Franciscos First Guatemalan Bakery Dies

Posted On Jul 31 2019 by

first_imgTraduccion en español aquí.Manuel Barrientos, the proprietor of San Francisco’s first Guatemalan bakery, was 79 when he died on November 25, but for many, his vigor and dedication to his craft made his age difficult to gauge. When Barrientos was diagnosed with a brain tumor and given just three months to live, it was not his own death that he feared most, but his inability to work, said his son.“He took it bad, because he wanted to keep working,” said the youngest of Barrientos’ three sons, David. Even during his final days, Barrientos could be found at Panaderia Universal, the mom-and-pop bakery and restaurant run by him and his family for some two decades at 30th and Mission streets, greeting his customers and making bread for his community.Manuel Barrientos, owner of Panaderia Universal, died on November 25 at age 79. Photo Courtesy of David Barrientos.Every day, the Daly City resident would go “from his house straight to the bakery,” said Sofia Keck, owner of Los Shucos Latin Hot Dogs, a Guatemalan street food restaurant at 22nd and Mission streets.In 2014, as Keck was searching for a Guatemalan baker with expertise in artisan bread before launching Los Shucos, she fought hard to convince Barrientos to take her on as a client.“He was hesitant,“ said Keck. “In the end, he didn’t do it because he needed the extra money – he did it because he wanted to help me.”Barrientos and his wife visited Los Shucos once before it opened for business. Inside the store, he invited Keck and her son to join him in prayer.“He was a very religious man,” said Keck. The radio at Panaderia Universal was usually tuned to a Catholic station. Those who knew Barrientos agree that he was fiercely focused on two things – his work and his family.  On most days, the two coexisted in the same space because running Panaderia Universal was a family affair that involved all of Barrientos’ sons and his wife, Vilma. “Walking into the bakery, you’d see David manning the register,” said Keck. “The others would be in the back making the bread.”David described his father as exemplary of the “American Dream,” sacrificing his own needs for his work, and later, for his family.“He wasn’t scared of working. Any laziness, he took it out of you,” said David. “At the same time, I have never seen a man treat a woman the way he treated my mother. He wouldn’t even eat until she was there.”Coming from a “long line of bakers” in Guatemala, David said, his father first began working in a bakery at age 5.“He didn’t have a childhood,” he said.At age 11, Barrientos ran away from home, according to his son, to escape his abusive father. It was his father’s work ethic, David said, that not only helped him to survive, but kept him out of trouble.After trying his hand at various businesses in Guatemala, Barrientos immigrated to San Jose in his 30s, where he picked fruit for a month before making his way to San Francisco to work at the Fairmont Hotel.But Barrientos’ passion for baking and for his Guatemalan culture never left him. Finding the latter to be lacking representation in San Francisco, Barrientos decided to open a business that would blend both.“He felt people needed something from back home, and there weren’t many businesses that represented us at the time,” said David.” In 1982, Barrientos began baking Champurradas – cookies typical to Guatemala – out of the kitchen of a former employer at 24th and Potrero streets. He then sold the cookies door to door – driving routes that took him on deliveries as far as Mountain View. “He and my mother both had a route – It was a team effort, that’s how they started,” said David, adding that the budding business, coupled with his day job, often had his father working 18 hour days. Some eight years later, the lease of the storefront that served as Barrientos’ makeshift bakery eventually fell into his hands, enabling him to open his first business and San Francisco’s first authentic Guatemalan bakery – on 24th Street. “That’s what motivated him,” said David. “There was nothing authentic from his country here.” But just as his bakery took off, a fire displaced Barrientos from the 24th and Potrero location in 1995, forcing him to reopen Panaderia Universal at 3458 Mission St. The move proved a beneficial as the new location came with a kitchen space, allowing Barrientos to expand into a full-fledged Guatemalan restaurant.And his customers from in and outside of the Guatemalan community willingly followed. “He left a great legacy. Not just with his business, but with his family,” said Keck. The doors at Los Shucos have been locked for the past week – the business remains closed out of respect for Barrientos and his family. Upon reopening, Keck said she will continue to source her bread from Panaderia Universal.“Even though our bread is made at Panaderia Universal because we don’t have the kitchen space, he always said that was our bread – Los Shucos bread,” said Keck.As for Panaderia Universal, Barrientos’ sons – and perhaps, one day his five grand children – will continue to carry on Barrientos’ legacy. Although perhaps they will work a little less.  “One thing he told us is, ‘Don’t follow my example,” said David. “Don’t work all the time.” The burial service for Manuel Barrientos will be on Sunday, December 4, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Cypress Lawn Funeral Home at 1370 El Camino Real in Colma. 0%center_img Tags: 24th Street • mission street • obituary Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more


Mission Style Friday casual meets the unexpected

Posted On Jul 31 2019 by

first_imgIt was a chill Friday in The Mission when we gathered interviews for this edition of Mission Style. The fashionistas who caught our eye this week wore casual looks, but added just the right amount of personal style and unexpected touches to stand apart from the sea of Missionites.Name: Eva TemplinVibe: Eva’s red printed dress was an easy, breezy punch of color among the greenery of Dolores Park. A black suede jacket and sparkling sandals anchored the look.Brands: Guess jacket, dress bought online at Dish, Longchamp bag, Fellini sandals. Who is your style icon? “Ooo. I think that is a tricky one. It’d be someone like — I don’t know, I can’t name, like, one particular one … But Natalie Portman would be one. Otherwise, I like girly, flirty. Yeah … or … Blake Lively.”Eva Templin. Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong.Eva Templin. Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong.Name: Sabrina Cruz CarpioVibe: Sabrina’s relaxed ‘90s chola style was fun, easy and cool. The varied jewelry, glasses and nails really elevated the whole look.Brands: “I’m pretty sure everything is thrifted, so I have no idea what brands they are. Yeah, everything is from like either Mission Thrift or Goodwill.”What are the benefits of buying thrifted? “First of all, that you will wear something that no one else has, and is way cheaper. And, I don’t know, it’s kind of a style … thrifting … like everyone’s doing.”Sabrina Cruz Carpio. Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong.Sabrina Cruz Carpio. Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong.Name: Emilija AndreevskaVibe: Emilija, Lepa and Irena are friends from Macedonia. Together, they nailed the latest trends, including the mini-backpack one.Brands: Mango jacket, Massimo Dutti pants, Ray-Ban sunglasses, backpack from Greece, Adidas sneakers.Favorite Style: “Urban street style.”Name: Lepa AngelkoskaBrands: Mango jacket, Zara t-shirt?, Zara pants, Urban Outfitters sunglasses, Parfois backpack, Michael Kors sneakers.What is your opinion on San Francisco style? “Well, I like it. It’s like, really you can see, like, everything. It’s really street fashion. Especially this area, it’s more, like, definitely street fashion. Yeah.”Name: Irena JolakoskaBrands: Stradivarius jeans, Parfois bag, Ray Ban sunglasses, Converse sneakers.How would you describe the fashion in Macedonia? “Uh, well, it’s a multicultural country, so the younger are very fashionist. I don’t know, it’s different. We keep in touch with the world fashion.”Emilija Andreevska, Lepa Angelkoska and Irena Jolakoska. Photo by Ekevara KitpowsongName: Mel TranVibe: We were ready to cross the street near Dolores Park when we saw Mel’s adorable cat tee. It was so cute, funny and unexpected. The Boba Guys tote just completed this light-hearted, loveable-animal-filled look.Brands: RIPNDIP T-Shirt, pants from TJ Maxx, sunglasses from Amazon, Adidas sneakers, Boba Guys tote.What makes cats awesome? “Um, everything!”Mel Tran. Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong. 0%center_img Tags: fashion • Photography Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more


ST HELENS Rugby League Clubs finances continued t

Posted On Jul 31 2019 by

first_imgST HELENS Rugby League Club’s finances continued to strengthen in the financial year ended 31 October 2015.Revenues increased by approximately 10 per cent from £7,124,794 in 2014 to £7,771,921 in 2015. Earnings before interest, tax and depreciation also improved from a loss of £371,211 in 2014 to a profit of £30,715 in 2015.Chairman Eamonn McManus stated: “The results reflect the healthy state of the Club’s financial position and commercial performance. This arises from our strong balance sheet position and the improved income generating opportunities emanating from our new stadium. I’d like to put on record my appreciation of all the hard working and professional staff at the club.“The financial position is undoubtedly more challenging in the 2016 season, deriving largely from a number of months when the rugby results were not as we would hope for and expect. This inevitably had a detrimental effect on crowd numbers and their related revenue streams.“That said, the robust and diversified business model of the club, and our ability to generate material non-rugby related income through the magnificent conferencing and hospitality opportunities which our new stadium offers, means that we can still expect a solid set of financial results in 2016.“Most importantly, the balance sheet and brand of the club each remain very strong and provide the platform for continued financial improvement in the medium and long terms.”last_img read more


Not only will be popular but with the festive sea

Posted On Jul 31 2019 by

first_imgNot only will be popular but, with the festive season approaching, are also the ideal Christmas gift.And they can be bought easily and simply by clicking here too.2018 Betfred Super League Launch Dinner – Monday January 29Every member of the playing and coaching staff will be in attendance as we launch the season in style.Join us for a two-course meal before each one of the squad goes on stage to be presented with their 2018 home shirt from their personal sponsors for the new seasonWe will also hear interviews with several of the first-team squad and an extended interview with Justin Holbrook with his thoughts and ambitions for the new season.Price is £36 for 2018 Members, £42 for Non-Members.This event is in association with our Principal Partner Cash Converters.St. Patricks Night – Saturday March 17No better date to host an Irish night than on St. Patricks Day itself…!Join us for authentic two-course Irish themed meal, a live band providing the entertainment and special offers on your favourite Irish drinks.Come and join us for a great night’s entertainment for just £20 per ticket.Comedy and Curry Night – Thursday May 17Join us for a fantastic night of live comedy as our selection of regional acts take to the stage at the Totally Wicked Stadium.Your ticket, priced at £20, includes curry and naan bread.Saints Golf Day – Wednesday July 4 To be held at Haydock Park Golf Course with first-team squad members in attendance along with Head Coach Justin HolbrookTeams of two are available to buy now and prizes are up for grabs for the winning team, longest drive, nearest to the pin and player of the day.The day will operate as a ‘Ryder Cup’ style format with our Team Captains Paul Sculthorpe and Tommy Martyn. The lads will perform a live draw over breakfast to determine which Captain you will play for.Stay with us late into the evening for a BBQ as the winners are crowned and prizes handed out.We expect places to sell quickly, so contact us now. Prices are £150 (ex VAT) per team of two.Sponsorship is also available, so if that is of interest please email us – sales@saintsrlfc.com2018 End of Season Awards – Monday September 24 Join us as we celebrate the achievements of our playing squads across the Club.Several awards will be presented throughout the evening with new categories to be introduced this year as we acknowledge the skills and hard work that our squad have consistently provided to drive us throughout the season.A fantastic two-course meal with tea & coffee will be served before the main part of the evening gets underway.Price is £36 for 2018 Members, £42 for Non-Members.This event is in association with our Stadium Partners Totally Wicked and will be hosted by our MC Pete Emmett.You can buy tickets for these events by clicking here or calling 01744 455 053.last_img read more


200000 Powerball ticket sold in Oak Island

Posted On Jul 30 2019 by

first_img One of those tickets was sold at the Olde Brunswick Store No. 2 on East Oak Island Drive in Oak Island.The sole $1,000,000 ticket sold in NC was bought in Granville County.“We are happy to see so many North Carolinians win big and their checks are waiting for them,” said Alice Garland, executive director of the N.C. Education Lottery. “This was also a big win for education in our state.”Related Article: Oak Island mayor’s son faces nearly a dozen more child sex chargesThe Powerball jackpot climbed to $758.7 million before last night’s drawing. The single winning ticket was sold in Massachusetts. BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — While no one in North Carolina walked away the big winner in Wednesday night’s Powerball drawing, several tickets are worth between $50,000 and $1,000,000.Six tickets matched four white balls and the Powerball, winning the base prize of $50,000. But, because thos buyers added the $1 Power Play feature, those prized quadrupled to $200,000 when the 4x multiplier was picked in the drawing.- Advertisement – last_img read more


Trump moves to vastly expand offshore drilling off US coasts

Posted On Jul 30 2019 by

first_imgOffshore drilling platform near Santa Barbara, CA. (Photo: Mike Baird / CC BY 2.0) By MATTHEW DALY, Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday moved to vastly expand offshore drilling from the Atlantic to the Arctic oceans with a plan that would open up federal waters off the California coast for the first time in more than three decades.- Advertisement – The new five-year drilling plan also could open new areas of oil and gas exploration in areas off the East Coast from Georgia to Maine, where drilling has been blocked for decades. Many lawmakers in those states support offshore drilling, although the Democratic governors of North Carolina and Virginia oppose drilling off their state coasts.Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, also opposes offshore drilling near his state, as do the three Democratic governors on the West Coast.Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced the plan Thursday, saying that responsible development of offshore energy resources would boost jobs and economic security while providing billions of dollars to fund conservation along U.S. coastlines.Related Article: Trump turns to health care with an eye on 2020The five-year plan would open 90 percent of the nation’s offshore reserves to development by private companies, Zinke said, with 47 leases proposed off the nation’s coastlines between 2019 and 2024. Nineteen sales would be off the coast of Alaska, 12 in the Gulf of Mexico, nine in the Atlantic and seven in the Pacific, including six off California’s coast.“This is a draft program,” Zinke said in a conference call with reporters. “Nothing is final yet, and our department is continuing to engage the American people to get to our final product.”Industry groups praised the announcement, which would be the most expansive offshore drilling proposal in decades. The proposal follows President Donald Trump’s executive order in April encouraging more drilling rights in federal waters, part of the administration’s strategy to help the U.S. achieve “energy dominance” in the global market.“To kick off a national discussion, you need a national plan – something that has been lacking the past several years,” said Randall Luthi, president of the National Ocean Industries Association. Former President Barack Obama blocked Atlantic and Pacific drilling under a five-year plan finalized in 2016.A coalition of more than 60 environmental groups denounced the plan, saying in a joint statement that it would impose “severe and unacceptable harm” to America’s oceans, coastal economies, public health and marine life.“These ocean waters are not President Trump’s personal playground. They belong to all Americans and the public wants them preserved and protected, not sold off to multinational oil companies,” read the statement, which was signed by leaders of the Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, League of Conservation Voters and other environmental groups. “This extreme proposal is a shameful giveaway” to the oil and gas industry, which supported Trump in the election campaign, the groups said.The proposal comes less than a week after the Trump administration proposed to rewrite or kill rules on offshore oil and gas drilling imposed after the deadly 2010 rig explosion and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The accident on BP’s Deepwater Horizon rig killed 11 workers and triggered the biggest offshore oil spill in U.S. history.The Trump administration called the rules an unnecessary burden on industry and said rolling them back will encourage more energy production. Environmentalists said Trump was raising the risk of more deadly oil spills.The Obama administration imposed tougher rules in response to the BP spill. The rules targeted blowout preventers, massive valve-like devices designed to prevent spills from wells on the ocean floor. The preventer used by BP failed. The rules require more frequent inspections of those and other devices and dictate that experts onshore monitor drilling of highly complex wells in real time.Nearly eight years after the BP spill, the Gulf of Mexico is still recovering, said Diane Hoskins, campaign director for the marine conservation group Oceana.“Americans have seen the devastation that comes from offshore drilling,” she said. “Will we allow Florida’s white beaches or the popular and pristine Outer Banks to share a similar fate? What about the scenic Pacific coast or even remote Arctic waters?”Zinke’s announcement “ignores widespread and bipartisan opposition to offshore drilling,” including from more than 150 municipalities nationwide and 1,200 local, state and federal officials, Hoskins said.Scott, the Florida governor, said in a statement he has asked for an immediate meeting with Zinke to discuss his concerns. “My top priority is to ensure that Florida’s natural resources are protected,’ Scott said.Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson said Florida cannot afford a spill like BP’s. “Every Floridian remembers what happened to us when the beaches of Pensacola Beach were blackened with tar and oil, and we lost a whole season of our guests, our tourists who come to this extraordinary state,” Nelson said, vowing to “do everything I can to defeat” Trump’s plan.California was the site of the first offshore drilling in the U.S. more than 120 years ago, but the region was tarnished by one of the worst spills in U.S. history in 1969, when more than 3 million gallons of oil poured into the ocean near Santa Barbara.Thousands of sea birds were killed, along with dolphins, elephant seals and sea lions. Virtually all commercial fishing near Santa Barbara was halted, and tourism dropped dramatically.Public outrage generated by the spill helped spark the modern environmental movement, and no federal leases have been granted off the California coast since 1984.last_img read more


Hit and run victim upset with how WPD handled case

Posted On Jul 30 2019 by

first_img In early February, he was ran over in the parking lot of Might as Well Bar and Grill, in Wilmington.‘After I got run over by the truck, thinking, ‘I’m still alive,’ I was just trying to see what body parts were working,” Iventosch said.The police report says Iventosch stood in one of the parking spots outside of the bar. The truck hit him and dragged him 12 feet from where he was standing. However, Iventosch says investigators told him he and his friends were to blame. He said it sounded like the officer was taking sides, saying the men in the other vehicle have families.Related Article: WPD: Snoring leads to stabbing at Wilmington hotel“These are all things that apply to me as well. So, I don’t know why it’s different for one side and it’s not the same for me,” Iventosch said.His mom is also furious with this as well.“He was playing the judge, the jury, the defense attorney. He had it all wrapped up right then and there. Nobody needed to be made aware of what happened because he had already figured it all out and decided ‘hey, you didn’t die. So buck up buttercup, everything will be fine,’” Sandra Iventosch said.Wilmington Police said on Facebook, “it was determined there was no criminal intent on the suspects part” and “that drugs and alcohol were involved on both sides.” Police say the driver turned himself in and it’s now a civil matter.The second time police questioned Iventosch, family members recorded the conversation. Police say because of what was heard on that audio recording, the office of the chief is investigating how the case was handled. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — What started as a fun night out, ended as a near death experience for a Wilmington man. Now he’s questioning how the Wilmington Police handled the investigation.“You don’t expect the police to immediately discount your recollection of what happened,” Vincent Iventosch said.- Advertisement – last_img read more