All-Star Game announcement plus a victory make for perfect day for Jazz

Posted On Aug 14 2020 by

first_imgSALT LAKE CITY — All the stars looked to be aligned as the Utah Jazz kicked off their 41st season Wednesday night with optimism not seen around here in about two decades, since the Stockton-and-Malone NBA Finals years.Not only was it opening night, but speaking of stars, just a few hours earlier, NBA commissioner Adam Silver announced that the 2023 All-Star Game was returning to Utah where the game had been played 30 years before. What could be more exciting? Scott G Winterton, Deseret News NBA commissioner Adam Silver announces that the 2023 NBA All-Star game will be held at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz win, but still a work in progress Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) defends Oklahoma City Thunder center Steven Adams (12) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Grid View Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz forwards Royce O’Neale (23) and Jeff Green (22) defend Oklahoma City Thunder guard Dennis Schroder (17) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with a 100-95 win over the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz guard Mike Conley (10) is fouled by Oklahoma City Thunder guard Chris Paul (3) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) hammers home a dunk over Oklahoma City Thunder forward Mike Muscala (33) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Related Utah Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) celebrates a 3-point shot as Utah opens the 2019-20 season with the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah won 100-95. Former Jazzman and current broadcast analyst Thurl Bailey serves as the emcee during the announcement that the 2023 NBA All-Star game will be held at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Greg Miller, Jim Olson, Larry H. Miller Sports and Entertainment, Utah Jazz Owner Gail Miller, NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Utah Gov. Gary R. Herbert, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, Larry H. Miller companies CEO Steve Starks, and Bear pose for photos following the announcement that the 2023 NBA All-Star game will be held at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Oklahoma City Thunder guard Hamidou Diallo (6) catches Utah Jazz forward Bojan Bogdanovic (44) in the throat during a play as the teams open the 2019-20 season at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz center Ed Davis (17) defends Oklahoma City Thunder forward Mike Muscala (33) at the basket as Utah opens the 2019/20 season against Oklahoma City at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Utah Jazz center Ed Davis (17) defends Oklahoma City Thunder forward Mike Muscala (33) at the basket as Utah opens the 2019/20 season against Oklahoma City at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Gail Miller makes a statement after NBA commissioner Adam Silver announced that the 2023 NBA All-Star game will be held at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) defends Oklahoma City Thunder guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander (2) under the basket as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with a 100-95 win at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Mike Conley (10) pushes up a shot with Oklahoma City Thunder guard Hamidou Diallo (6) defending as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) celebrates a 3-point shot as Utah opens the 2019-20 season with the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah won 100-95. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) battles Oklahoma City Thunder forward Mike Muscala (33) for the ball as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Surprisingly, when longtime Jazz P.A. announcer Dan Roberts read a blurb about “the NBA awarding the 2023 All-Star Game to Utah” during the second timeout of the game, it received only mild applause from the sold-out Vivint Arena crowd. Perhaps the excitement from the official announcement 3 1/2 hours earlier had worn off by then or maybe fans were worried about the fact their team had scored just 12 points in the first seven minutes.But talking to several fans around the arena confirmed that there is genuine excitement about the return of the All-Star Game. Longtime Jazz fans Ken and Jenni Vitrano were sitting on Level 5 finishing up their dinner, both wearing Utah Jazz sweatshirts and “Smurf” style wigs with blue and black hair sticking straight up (the “hats” had been part of a Deseret News promotion in 2004). “I’m excited about that, it’s a big deal,” said Ken. “There’ll be a lot of revenue coming in and it will put Utah on the map and be a chance to showcase our state.”As for the upcoming season, he said, “I’m excited about it, but they have to learn to play together better. The longer they play together they’ll gel more as a team.”Andy and Dottie Whitehorn sitting in Section 19, both wearing John Stockton No. 12 jerseys, called themselves Jazz fans from “a long time ago, since the 1970s,” although they didn’t live in Utah when the last All-Star Game was here.“It’s a new season, anything can happen, but we’re hoping for the best,” Andy said.As for the All-Star Game announcement, Andy said, “It’s wonderful, BUT IT’S FOUR YEARS AWAY.” Then, lowering his voice, he said, “I wish it was next year.” “We’re excited about the All-Star Game coming here,” Dottie added.Former Jazzman Thurl Bailey, now a TV analyst for the Jazz and looking resplendent in a shiny purple suit, remembers the ‘93 All-Star Game well and is excited about getting All-Star Weekend back in Utah. “It’s awesome,” he said. “I wasn’t on the team, but I was here during the All-Star weekend and watched my former teammates Karl and John get the MVP. “It’s great timing with the renovations on the building and the new additions to the team. It’s a great honor to have it coming back here. It’s great for the state.” Scott G Winterton, Deseret News NBA commissioner Adam Silver announces that the 2023 NBA All-Star game will be held at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News as the Utah Jazz opens the 2019/20 season with the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) yells to to the bench after a made shot as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah won 100-95. Utah coach Quin Snyder directs his team as the Utah Jazz open the 2019-20 season against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) turns to look back during a Oklahoma City Thunder foul shot as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) celebrates after a made shot with Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) as Utah opens the 201920 season against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) defends Oklahoma City Thunder center Steven Adams (12) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) is fouled by Oklahoma City Thunder center Steven Adams (12) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz guard Mike Conley (10) pushes up a shot with Oklahoma City Thunder guard Hamidou Diallo (6) defending as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Greg Miller, Jim Olson, Larry H. Miller Sports and Entertainment, Utah Jazz Owner Gail Miller, NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Utah Gov. Gary R. Herbert, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, Larry H. Miller companies CEO Steve Starks, and Bear pose for photos following the announcement that the 2023 NBA All-Star game will be held at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Former Jazzman and current broadcast analyst Thurl Bailey serves as the emcee during the announcement that the 2023 NBA All-Star game will be held at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) hammers home a dunk over Oklahoma City Thunder forward Mike Muscala (33) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Oklahoma City Thunder guard Hamidou Diallo (6) catches Utah Jazz forward Bojan Bogdanovic (44) in the throat during a play as the teams open the 2019-20 season at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah coach Quin Snyder directs his team as the Utah Jazz open the 2019-20 season against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95.center_img Utah Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) looks at his injured hand just before the half as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz forward Joe Ingles (2) is whistled for a foul on Oklahoma City Thunder guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander (2) as Utah opens the 2019-20 season against Oklahoma City at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Utah Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) holds his injured hand as he runs off the court at the half as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz forwards Royce O’Neale (23) and Jeff Green (22) defend Oklahoma City Thunder guard Dennis Schroder (17) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with a 100-95 win over the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Oklahoma City Thunder guard Chris Paul (3) and Utah Jazz guard Mike Conley (10) talk after the game as the Jazz open the 2019/20 season with win over the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah won 100-95. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) looks at his injured hand just before the half as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) defends Oklahoma City Thunder guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander (2) under the basket as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with a 100-95 win at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) celebrates after a made shot with Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) as Utah opens the 201920 season against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Grid View Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) yells to to the bench after a made shot as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah won 100-95. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) turns to look back during a Oklahoma City Thunder foul shot as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Joe Ingles (2) is whistled for a foul on Oklahoma City Thunder guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander (2) as Utah opens the 2019-20 season against Oklahoma City at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Jazz dancers leave the floor after a timeout as the Utah Jazz open the 2019-20 season against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Unfortunately Mike Conley, who came to the team amid much fanfare in the offseason, looked more like his predecessor at point guard, with an abysmal Ricky Rubio-esque 1-for-16 performance. However, afterward coach Quin Snyder praised Conley’s defensive performance despite his poor shooting night. So now it’s on to play the Lakers Friday night, followed quickly by games against Sacramento Saturday, Phoenix Monday and the L.A. Clippers Wednesday.It was a big day all around for the Jazz, who are looking forward to big things in 2019-20 with something else to look forward to in 2023. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) signs autographs after the game as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with win over the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah won 100-95. Utah Jazz guard Mike Conley (10) is fouled by Oklahoma City Thunder guard Chris Paul (3) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) battles Oklahoma City Thunder forward Mike Muscala (33) for the ball as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Oklahoma City Thunder guard Chris Paul (3) and Utah Jazz guard Mike Conley (10) talk after the game as the Jazz open the 2019/20 season with win over the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah won 100-95. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News Utah Jazz forward Royce O’Neale (23) holds his injured hand as he runs off the court at the half as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Jazz dancers leave the floor after a timeout as the Utah Jazz open the 2019-20 season against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. The Jazz won 100-95. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell (45) signs autographs after the game as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with win over the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah won 100-95. Gail Miller makes a statement after NBA commissioner Adam Silver announced that the 2023 NBA All-Star game will be held at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. All that was needed to top off a big day was a Jazz victory, which after many anxious moments finally came to pass as Utah eked out a five-point victory to send the Jazz faithful home happy.Earlier in the day, the Jazz had made their “major announcement,” one that they had been keeping under their hats for the better part of a year, according to Jazz CEO Steve Starks. The governor and the mayor joined Jazz officials for the NBA’s announcement, which was was met with enthusiasm from all sides. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News 3 keys from the Utah Jazz’s 100-95 season-opening win over the Oklahoma City Thunder Scott G Winterton, Deseret News as the Utah Jazz opens the 2019/20 season with the Oklahoma City Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert (27) is fouled by Oklahoma City Thunder center Steven Adams (12) as the Jazz open the 2019-20 season with the Thunder at Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Scott G Winterton, Deseret News After the first quarter, 1280 AM radio personality Tony Parks and the Jazz Bear roamed the stands handing out about a dozen No. 23 Jazz jerseys in honor of the 2023 All-Star Game, not Jazz forward Royce O’Neale, who wears that number. But that was the end of any talk about the 2023 All-Star Game, as everyone turned their attention to the court. The Jazz were lucky the Thunder didn’t have much more than Chris Paul in their lineup. Paul, one of those visiting players Jazz fans love to boo, scored 22 points with eight rebounds and three assists. The Thunder also had a guy named Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, who played for the Clippers last year and he led the Thunder with 26 points, while another OKC newcomer, Danilo Gallinari, added 21.On the other hand, the Jazz were lucky they had Donovan Mitchell, who looks like he’s upped his game a couple of notches since last year as he finished with 32 points and a career-high 12 rebounds. Without Mitchell and his 14-of-22 shooting that included a spectacular driving two-handed dunk to end the first half, the Jazz would have surely started the season with a defeat against a team not expected to make the playoffs. Scott G Winterton, Deseret Newslast_img read more


CBA wins again; eyes state title next

Posted On May 31 2020 by

first_img BY GEORGE ALBANOStaff Writer PHOTOS BY CHRIS KELLY staff Above, CBA’s Larkin MacDonald swims the anchor leg of the 400-yard freestyle relay race during the Shore Conference Championships at the Ocean County YMCA on Saturday. At left, Michael Harm swims his leg of the 400 freestyle relay. Winning the Shore Conference championship year after year never gets to be “old hat” for the Christian Brothers Academy (CBA) swim team. Just ask their coach. “No, it’s a very exciting every time,” Michael Sullivan said after the Colts captured their 15th straight conference title on Saturday at the Ocean County YMCA in Toms River. “The Shore Conference is a large conference with 40 some teams in it, so it’s really a big thing. It’s always a fun meet and there are a lot of good swimmers in the conference. “So our kids are very excited about winning it. It’s special to win it every year because the teams change from year to year.” But the results don’t. As usual CBA, the No. 2-ranked boys swim team in the state, dominated the competition, finishing with 379 points to easily outdistance runner-up Toms River North, which finished with 250 points. “It was a good meet. We had a lot of good swims,” said Sullivan, who in his 15th season has coached CBA to every title during its incredible run. “Last year, we didn’t win any of the relays so this year we wanted to, and we won all three. Last year, we finished second in all three.” What more, the Colts set new Shore Conference records in two of them. The 200-medley relay team of junior Larkin MacDonald, seniors Donato Santangelo and Greg Plakoudas, and sophomore Kyle Slate set a new record with its winning time of 1:41.01, breaking the previous mark of 1:41.42 set in 2002. Meanwhile, the 400-freestyle relay team of juniors Chris Cefalo and Mike Harm, MacDonald and senior Kelly McCarthy also won in a record-shattering time of 3:18.24, almost a full second faster than the old record of 3:19.18 established in 1998. The 200-free relay team of Cefalo, senior Nolan Doyle, junior Ryan Guttornsen and McCarthy completed the sweep with a winning time of 1:31.73. In addition, CBA won two individual events as McCarthy finished first in the 100 butterfly in 54.34 seconds, while MacDonald captured top honors in the 100 backstroke in 53.74. That gave the Colts wins in five of the 12 events, while their superior depth piled up additional points. McCarthy added a second-place finish in the 200 freestyle, while MacDonald was third in the 200 IM. Santangelo finished third in the 100 breaststroke, Cefalo was fourth in both the 50 and 100 freestyles, Andrew DiPietro placed third in the 500 free and sixth in the IM, and Harm was sixth in the 200 freestyle. With a total of 36 swimmers on the team, Sullivan says his formula for success is very simple. “We have a lot of club swimmers and that makes a difference in high school,” he pointed out. “They get additional training early in the season and more hours in the pool than I can provide. “Plus, we have a lot of kids who swim only high school,” said Sullivan, a former swimmer himself at St. Francis Prep in Brooklyn and then St. Francis College. “We have a core of about 15 kids who just swim high school and train with me. The rest are all club swimmers. The combination of both seems to be a good recipe for success.” Another factor is the Colts always seem to have swimmers ready to step in and replace those who graduate. They never rebuild; only reload. This year’s team, for example, has eight seniors on the roster, but it also has 11 juniors and 17 sophomores and freshmen. “Every year we have between eight and 11 seniors. We always have a pretty good mix,” said Sullivan, a physical education teacher at Aldrich Elementary School in Howell. “We usually have a lot of upperclassmen, but we always have a bunch of young kids coming in behind them and ready to step in.” And with one championship already locked up, the Colts have set their sights on another with the NJSIAA state team tournament beginning this week. Eight teams will be competing in the Non-Public A class, and CBA, the No. 2 seed, will host No. 7 Bergen County today at home in a first-round matchup. St. Augustine, the top-ranked swim team in the state and the only team to beat CBA, is the No. 1 seed. The Colts, 9-1 during the dual-meet season, lost to St. Augustine 88-82 back in December. Meanwhile, one of CBA’s nine victories was a thrilling 86-84 win over St. Joseph of Metuchen, the No. 3 team in the state and the third seed in Non-Public A. Should CBA and St. Joe’s both win on Wednesday as expected, the two teams would meet in a rematch in the state semifinals next Tuesday at CBA. The winner of that meet would then likely meet St. Augustine in the state final on Sunday, Feb. 27 at the College of New Jersey. “It should be an interesting team tournament,” said Sullivan, who coached CBA to the 1998 state title. “Three parochial schools are the three top teams in the state and only one of them can win a state championship because we’re all in the same division. It’s gonna be tough because the three teams are all very close. It’s going to come down to who’s healthy and who swims well. You never know with kids. “But it’s gonna be a lot of fun either way, and very interesting. The championship team tournaments at the end of the season are what we point to all year.” Which is probably why winning them never gets to be old hat, even for the CBA swim team. BY GEORGE ALBANO Staff Writer last_img read more


Governor’s task force a step in right direction

Posted On May 31 2020 by

first_img Doug McKenzie After further review In early April, all 12 of Greater Media’s newspapers published a comprehensive look at steroid use within local high schools. The report detailed the types of steroids being used, as well as the dangers that steroid use presents to teenagers. Several stories also dealt with the different perspectives on the prevalence of steroid use within our schools, from the points of view from athletic directors to coaches and the student-athletes themselves. The response was similar from all three groups — something along the lines of “we know it’s out there, but we don’t think it’s a problem in our school.” Unfortunately, the facts dispute that belief, and now acting Gov. Richard J. Codey wants to know just how big a problem steroids in our schools have become, and what needs to be done to police the abuse. Codey recently signed a landmark executive order creating a task force, the Governor’s Task Force on Steroid Use and Prevention, to examine steroid use in high school, making New Jersey the first state to take a comprehensive approach to addressing the growing problem of steroid use among high school athletes. “Sports teach about teamwork and fellowship, leadership and discipline, and good, clean competition,” Codey said. “Steroid use, however, is threatening this safe outlet. This is an emergent public health crisis, and New Jersey cannot and will not bury its head in the sand. “We have a responsibility to help our schools and parents as they grapple with this alarming trend,” he continued. “To force school districts to make a decision on this on their own is unfair. They cannot and should not go it alone.” During a press conference in Trenton, Codey cited many of the same studies reported in Greater Media’s steroid package, all of which point to an increase in usage across the board. Last year, 3.4 percent of 12th-graders nationwide admitted to using anabolic steroids at least once, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). That’s up 67 percent since 1991. In addition, 2.4 percent of 10th-graders and 1.9 percent of eighth-graders said they have used anabolic steroids at least once, according to the NIDA. Forty percent of 12th-graders described steroids as “fairly easy” or “very easy” to get, and fewer and fewer students believe steroids are bad for them. There is also an upsurge in steroid use among girls. Codey’s task force includes doctors, some highly influential high school and college sports administrators from throughout the state, as well as Peter King, a senior writer at Sports Illustrated, and the magazine’s primary NFL expert. Among some of the more familiar people on the task force are Monsignor Michael E. Kelly, the task force chairman, who has served as headmaster of Seton Hall Preparatory School in West Orange since 1980; Robert E. Mulcahy III, who has worked as the athletic director at Rutgers University since 1998; Wilbur Aikens, the athletic director for the Piscataway Public School District, the director of the Athletic Association of New Jersey, and a member of the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) Executive Committee; Robert W. Baly, the assistant director of NJSIAA; David G. Evans, the executive director of the Drug Free School Zones Coalition; and William L. Librera Ed.D, New Jersey’s commissioner of education. The task force will be busy over the next few months preparing to develop a statewide steroid policy for high school athletes, and will deliver a report to Codey by Dec. 1. As part of the process, the task force will hold public hearings and a summit to gather information on the physical and psychological effects of steroid use on teenagers; determine the extent of the problem among high school student-athletes in New Jersey; ascertain the feasibility, legality and prudence of implementing statewide mandatory steroid testing; develop a statewide steroid education program to be taught in New Jersey schools; determine the most appropriate academic setting, such as physical education or health class, in which to implement said educational program; and examine the effects and prevalence of other performance enhancers, such as nutritional supplements, and determining whether or not to include information on them in the proposed educational program. That’s quite a lengthy list of objectives, but the findings that will get most athletes’ and administrators’ attention will be the part about mandatory steroid testing. Everyone agrees that steroids are bad for you. And everyone agrees that we need to get and/or keep them out of our schools. But not everyone agrees on mandatory drug testing as a means of doing so. While a total of 11 school districts — including Brick Township — throughout the state have already begun randomly testing students for substance abuse, it remains a hot issue. “I can’t imagine anyone not wanting to know if their child is abusing himself,” said Old Bridge’s High School’s longtime wrestling coach, Ken Scott. “I could never understand why testing could be considered such a negative thing.” Shore Regional cross country and track and field coach Mel Ullmeyer agrees, noting that athletes should be anxious to put any doubts to rest. “If a kid wants to be an athlete, he should be willing to be tested because if he’s an athlete, he shouldn’t be involved with that stuff in the first place,” he said. But anytime someone’s right to privacy is in question, it becomes a complicated issue. It will be interesting to see how much opposition presents itself once the governor’s task force examines the idea of mandatory testing. Put in proper perspective, the health and well-being of our student-athletes, many of whom are facing pressure to succeed for the first time, should be a priority. Let’s hope the governor’s task force is able to drive that point home.last_img read more


Traditional Kyrgyz walnut-apple forests provide map for sustainable future

Posted On Feb 10 2020 by

first_imgArticle published by Erik Hoffner Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Agroforestry, Archive, Biodiversity, Conservation Solutions, Featured, food security, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Poverty Alleviation, Sustainable Development center_img In the Kyrgyz mountain town of Kyzyl-Unkur, farmers grow mixed forests of walnut, apple, apricot, pear, almond and cherry trees in a traditional system of agroforestry that stretches back centuries.Beneath the fruit and nut trees, honey from beehives and mushrooms are collected, and hay is mown for livestock, providing multiple products for sale and consumption during the seasons.Kyrgyzstan currently has numerous environmental challenges such as land, forest and pasture degradation, which agroforestry could alleviate.Agroforestry also sequesters atmospheric carbon in trees and soil, and provides habitat for wild creatures. KYZL-UNKUR, Jalalabad region, Kyrgyzstan — The mountain road leading to Kyzyl-Unkur winds through a gorge. Three hours later, on a broken road, one finds the village surrounded on all sides by unique relict walnut forests. Here, the local Kyrgyz population lives from generation to generation.Everyone knows each other and who does what. Because of its remoteness from large settlements, a traditional way of life has been preserved here. All the inhabitants are farmers, engaged in raising livestock and growing crops. The total forest area of ​​Kyzyl-Unkur is 520 square kilometers (200 square miles), of which 225 square kilometers (87 square miles) are forested and the rest pasture. The walnut forests alone cover 37 square kilometers (14 square miles).But a recent sharp increase in livestock numbers has taken a heavy toll on the pastures, causing land degradation and a decrease in the productivity of the vegetative cover. Because of this, the cattle have begun to enter the forests and impact the ecosystem.Agroforestry delivers multiple products for sale. Samidinov Kazybek’s dryer makes mushrooms, fruits and herbs ready for sale. Image by Cholpon Uzakbaeva for MongabayThe villagers have begun to change their stance on this practice, though, trying not to move the cattle into the forest and looking at the forests from a different angle: not as a free source of fuel and grazing pasture, but rather from the angle of agroforestry.Historical arc of agroforestryAt the heart of agroforestry is the growing of different crops in a particular spot all together: fruit trees, shrubs and vegetables that yield produce at different times in summer and autumn. The Kyzyl-Unkur farmers together with the regional forestry department benefit from forests through agroforestry. The practice also benefits the ecosystem. They all pursue one goal: to preserve natural areas of forest and increase the area of ​​forests through agroforestry.“Kyrgyzstan since ancient times is well known with its nomadic culture and livelihoods primarily based on livestock production,” said Klara Dzhakypbekova, coordinator of the SUSWALFOOD Research Project, a program of the Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences in Germany focused on the development of nutritious food from wild plant species from Kyrgyz walnut forest ecosystems. “The first ideas of using agroforestry came with the Persian garden culture across the Silk Road, and more profoundly developed later with Russian gardeners coming to the areas to develop fruit tree gardening techniques.”Sartbaev Abdykerim, a forestry technician at the local forestry department, described what agroforestry represented when Kyrgyzstan was later part of the Soviet Union: “Under the Soviet Union, a planned system of work was in place. All lands belonged to the state forest fund, the main purpose of which was the conservation of biodiversity and protection of forest ecosystems,” he said.Collecting fruits of the agroforest. Image by Cholpon Uzakbaeva for Mongabay“Work began on the development of new varieties of apple trees from wild [stock], creating large gardens. The local population was attracted to harvest walnuts, apples, medicinal herbs like St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum), nettle (Urtica urens), mint (Mentha piperita), yarrow (Achillea millefolium), immortelle (Helichrysum arenarium), chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), and oregano (Origanum vulgare),” Abdykerim said. For this, he added, they received money or coupons for the purchase of goods in the grocery store.“It was tight control from the state. The forestry department [owned] farm horses, apiaries, nurseries. Foresters planted wild apple trees in the forests, and in open areas created industrial plantations, planted potatoes, [and] clover was planted among the forest and haymaking was carried out in the forests,” Abdykerim said. “After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the amount of funding from the state budget fell sharply. Forestry [department] was forced to lease forests to the public due to a lack of budget for harvesting walnuts.”Erkin Bakirov displays his bees. Image by Cholpon Uzakbaeva for MongabayAfter reform of the state system of forest management, the forestry department, or leshoz, began to introduce community management of forests. But only 10 percent of farmers agreed to do it this way. Those who did were provided with a plot of fruit-bearing forest in exchange for services like growing seedlings and collecting seeds.But since 2007, Abdykerim said, the method of community management has been simplified: “Now the plots are leased, one hectare for 1,000 soms,” or about $15. A single hectare (2.5 acres) can yield up to 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds) of walnuts, which can bring a profit of up to $1,000.Such plots can be rented for five to 50 years on a competitive basis. Each farmer proposes a program for the protection of the site, the planting of forests, and the use of resources. A selection committee with representatives from the local government, civil society and leshoz then picks the most original programs with good ideas.The foresters make a list of all the crops on rented plots and note exact amounts. The sites fall under the control of forest rangers, who regularly visit them. If the terms of the contract are violated, the leshoz has the right to terminate the contract. For its part, the leshoz plants 30 hectares (74 acres) of industrial-sized plantations in open areas, annually growing 25,000 seedlings of various kinds.Seasonal harvestsThe farmers derive their income from the harvesting of walnuts (Juglans regia), morel mushrooms (Morchella esculenta), apples (Malus sp.), honey and hay. In early spring, they start picking morel mushrooms, which grow mainly under walnut trees. In the summer, they can reap one or two harvests of honey. In September, farmers collect one harvest of walnuts and apples as they mature, while hay for livestock is mown twice. Crops are sold as needed in the local market or to resellers. Walnuts and mushrooms typically go to China and Turkey, and honey to the domestic market.Walnuts and apples grown in an agroforestry system. Image by Cholpon Uzakbaeva for MongabayBakirov Erkinbek, a farmer, rented a forest plot in 2016, a high-altitude site of 5 hectares (12 acres) where he collects nuts. He takes care of the plot by cleaning the springs and collecting the eggs of gypsy moths (Lymantria dispar), an insect that feeds on the leaves of apple and walnut trees. Among the bushes he plants walnut seedlings; here there is a greater probability that animals will not trample the seedlings, and so they can grow to maturity.Erkinbek tends a second plot, lower down the mountains, near the edge of the forest. Here he practices agroforestry through another approach, planting walnut, apple, apricot, pear, almond, cherry and dog rose (Rosa canina) seedlings. Next to the cultured breeds he planted wild seedlings. If one of the seedlings dies, another will continue to grow. In two years, 90 percent of the seedlings took root. Between the rows there’s the natural hay of wild grasses, as well as planted clover and potatoes.“Mixing different cultures pays,” Erkinbek said. “We have a sharp continental climate here, so the weather is unpredictable every year. And this directly affects the yield. In good years I get an excellent harvest of nuts, apples, mushrooms. It is profitable for me to deal with agroforestry. And I hope gradually I will be able to give up livestock and get the main income from agroforestry.”It’s very possible, according to agroforestry expert Dzhakypbekova. She said research had shown positive effects from agroforestry on household incomes, as well as on the ecological conditions of the land.Forage for livestock like this hay grown between or under trees is another benefit of the system. Image by Cholpon Uzakbaeva for Mongabay“Kyrgyzstan is currently encountering a number of environmental challenges such as land, forest and pasture degradation,” she said. “Agroforestry might be a sustainable option to find a resolution for such issues and to improve the well-being of the rural households.“It is possible to develop agroforestry practices which are relevant to the given conditions and would be accepted by the local farmers,” Dzhakypbekova added. “For instance, degraded pasture plots might be planted with fruit trees and forage intercropped to meet the increasing demand for forage.”In such ways, agroforestry could be a significant part of the country’s agricultural future, as it has been in the past.This article is part of an ongoing series on agroforestry worldwide, see all the features here.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post.last_img read more


Raising the temperature…

Posted On Jan 18 2020 by

first_img…in politicsYour Eyewitness has oft written (…like that, eh??!!) about events serving as “Rorschach Tests” that reveal the mindsets and motivations of political actors in Guyana. But with the fallout from the “Chronicle firings” we don’t need to project anything…the players are openly “telling it like it is”!! It’s like everyone has now been given Superman’s “X-ray vision” – adapted to expose political machinations!!The “official” explanation by the Chronic editor for firing Hinds and Lewis was the paper was being “rebranded”. Let’s take that for what it’s worth and examine the writings of the fellas who replaced the two whose heads were served on a platter, a la Salome and Herod, for clues about the “rebranding”!! They’re two youngsters who seem to’ve been just exposed to the western “classics” in book form and couldn’t have possibly been around long enough to experience how the nuggets of wisdom might’ve fared in our Guyanese reality.It’s clear the two young men still believe history unfolds in a unilinear fashion along paths trod by the Greeks and Romans. Even Black Panther hasn’t woken them up to the fact that there can be other (maybe more relevant) trajectories!! Anyhow, one of the replacements, essayed a piece taken from the Philippics of Cicero against the ambitions of Mark Anthony to take over the Roman Empire. He warned against “The Enemy Within” who’re doubly dangerous because they speak in the “accents” of the incumbents. In other words, they’re traitors to the Republic.This argument was made explicitly against David Hinds by the fella your Eyewitness referred to yesterday, Milton Bruce, who seem to have a real grouse against the activist. His venom is palpable! And this is where your Eyewitness thinks things are getting out of hand. Once the “chosen” start using words like “enemies” and “betrayal” of “us” and “they” will get in to do “us” in, then we are unleashing a misdset that took us over the abyss before.This is the language of extremism that inevitably leads us to ensure “purity” of those who’ll be allowed to enter into the Kingdom of (in our case) the coming oil wealth. Hinds and Lewis have repeatedly assured the powers-that-be they’re committed to the end game, but are just in disagreement with some particulars. This is not “pure” enough for the new gatekeepers, so what about the rest of us??It’s just like when that upstart Rodney dared to tell Burnham he was insulting African Guyanese when he assumed they’d railroad a “PPP Indian” from the Corentyne, for treason.And we all know the “sharper steel” had to be brought out, don’t we? It’s like déjà vu all over again!!…in elections riggingHave you, dear readers, been following the accusations of a Data Mining company – Cambridge Analytica (CA) – having access to 50 million Facebook accounts – and using the info to possibly influencing the last US elections on behalf of Trump? Now, while most have been obsessing about the betrayal of the Facebook business model’s confidentiality assurances to its members, your Eyewitness is more concerned about the “influencing” of elections by CA!!He’s always assumed Facebook would be using its data to make money – and that means closing their eyes to a whole lot of slackness. But while you, dear reader, may believe this kind of data exploitation might work in the US where everyone’s plugged into the Matrix, and it doesn’t concern us, think again!! News is out from a secret taping of a CA executive by a British TV Channel, they were involved in the recently (very) troubled elections in Ghana that had to be held over because of violations!And, dear reader, if data manipulation could affect the Kenyan elections, why should we be exempt??…of waterGWI just announced they want to build a new HQ on prime Bel Air land they reclaimed because a fence was obstructing the Lama Canal.As opposed to a building?last_img read more


Mental health unhealthiness

Posted On Jan 18 2020 by

first_imgDear Editor,He posted a heart wrenching appeal, sometime after midnight, a few days on the Face book page of The Caribbean Voice (www.caribvoice.org), asking for help because he was having familiar feelings of the kind that had driven him to attempt suicide once before.Immediately, some members of the group sprang into action. As we engaged him in chat, someone from the Mental Health Unit of the Ministry of Health joined in and quickly phone-messaged a counsellor. It took a while, but eventually the doctor called and set up an appointment for him at the Georgetown Public Hospital, at eight 08:00h. We continued to engage him until he went to bed sometime after two that same morning, promising that he would do nothing foolish, but instead would keep the appointment the following day.As daylight chased away darkness, he informed us that he was keeping his appointment, thankful that he was getting professional help. But his arrival at the hospital created confusion and frustration as no one could direct him to the doctor he was seeking. Frustration was turning to resignation as he texted that he was leaving and going to the seawall to end it all. As one member of The Caribbean Voice kept him engaged, the same personnel from the Mental Health Unit, who had put him in connection with the doctor, hurried to the hospital, some two hours plus after the 19-year-old had arrived. Yet it took that person almost another hour before she could connect him with the help he needed.The young man was given attention but refused to stay over for observation, as he was under the popular misconception that only ‘mad’ people are held back at the psych ward and he most definitely was not mad. And while he initially agreed to keep the subsequent appointment some three days later, he later changed his mind. So, The Caribbean Voice continues to engage him, as we usually do with regards to all our cases, hoping that we can still persuade him to take the additional counselling.This experience begs the following questions:1.Why was it impossible for hospital staff to direct the young man to psych ward? Surely this information should be available at reception desks and known by all staff?2.Why was there no mental health professional to meet with the young man until close to 11:00h even though he had an 08:00h appointment? Surely the staff at the mental health unit knows that delays and consequent frustration can concretise the final act of suicide?In any case the young man is in an upbeat mood, since he found a temporary job, as his lack of employment was a trigger for his suicidal mindset, especially since it clearly created tension between him and his parents with whom he lives, and for whom he feels responsible. And, having once before attempted suicide, suicide ideation came very easy to him.Frighteningly, however, is that youth unemployment is 40 per cent according to the Caribbean Development Bank, a state of affairs that is fertile ground for youth suicide ideation and actual suicides, and may well already be impacting both, given that so many suicides go unreported. Thus our concern that government seems to be going back on its election campaign promise to provide jobs for the youth.While we applaud the efforts being undertaken thus far, especially by the Police and the First Lady, we strongly urge that these be extended nationwide, be as inclusive as possible and be followed by job placements, perhaps in collaboration with the various business associations.We suggest too that all high schools implement summer, work study internships for students moving into fifth forms and perhaps extend this to weekends/evenings where possible during the fifth form years. A job placement programme is also needed for all tertiary level educational institutions.Alarmingly too, the myth that dealing with counselling and the psych ward or the psychiatric institution means someone is ‘mad’, holds tremendous sway in Guyana and that may be why transparent and obvious warning signs are ignored by caregivers and loved ones.Far too often, after a suicide, we hear or read that so and so had talked about wanting to take his or her life but those around him/her thought he/she was joking and/or did not take that person seriously. Thus TCV strongly urges the Ministry of Health to embark on a sustained education campaign to combat this myth.As well, we urge the Ministry of Health to make sure that mental health professionals are available 24/7 at public hospitals, especially where there are psych wards and that mechanisms, including signage providing directions, be put in place to make access to such wards easy and quick for anyone seeking help, given that delays and consequential frustration/anger can lead to loss of lives.This particular case also brings to the fore the suicide hotline. Empirical and anecdotal evidence indicates that Guyanese are hardly utilising the hotline and we do recall that an appeal last year for figures to be released was met with deafening silence in spite of claims of its success.The Caribbean Voice has been publicising the hotline via our self-esteem pledge which has been distributed to schools and communities in many parts of Guyana. However, it is critical that the Ministries of Public Security and Health embark on an ongoing, national campaign to make the suicide hotline a household item and to encourage citizens to make use of it with the promise of absolute confidentiality every time. As well as statistical and related evidence proving its extensive use and success ought to be made public, as this will bolster widespread confidence in its effectiveness. After all, it would have been quicker for the young man to call the hotline and get help than to reach out to TCV via Face book.On the issue of confidentiality, TCV has also found that too many Guyanese are still sceptical of counsellors and counselling because of claims that confidentiality is not often kept. In fact, the grapevine revealed that a suicide prevention activist, who committed suicide last year, might have done so partly because the confidentiality she was promised was breached.That is why the promise of confidentiality with regards to the suicide hotline is so absolutely critical. And perhaps that is why, far too often, those seeking help emphatically refuse counselling in Guyana and/or by Guyanese, when we place that on the table for them.Also, this case and many others that TCV has handled over the last two years, make it clear that mental healthcare has to be national in scope and easy of access. Thus TCV reiterates its call for mental healthcare to be integrated into the physical health care system, per the recommendation of the World Health Organisation, for nations like Guyana. And we urge that a look be taken at the Shri Lankan Model in this respect, as that nation has very successfully implemented this integration. For the record our interventions are pro bono and while we do have our own complement of counsellors we also do sometimes refer cases to various counsellors in Guyana with whom we have developed relationships, and who also offer their services free of charge to our referrals. Incidentally, not all of our cases are related to suicide. In fact we have handled domestic violence, sex abuse and rape, child abuse and alcoholism cases as well, and while most of our cases are from Guyana we have dealt with cases in a number of other countries as well, since people seek us out through our Internet and social media presence.Sincerely,The Caribbean Voicelast_img read more


South Korean golfer gets three-year ban for middle finger gesture

Posted On Jan 12 2020 by

first_img0Shares0000Kim Bi-o kneels and begs for forgiveness before being banned for three years by the Korean Professional Golf Association © YONHAP/AFPSEOUL, Korea, Republic of, Oct 1 – A South Korean golfer has been suspended for three years for sticking up his middle finger at the crowd over a cellphone camera noise, the Korea Professional Golfers’ Association (KPGA) said Tuesday.Kim Bi-o reacted angrily after he was startled by the shutter sound of a smartphone camera which affected his shot at the 16th hole at Sunday’s DGB Financial Group Volvik Daegu Gyeongbuk Open. Kim, who leading by a stroke at the time, turned to the crowd and made the gesture before slamming his club on the ground in frustration.The 29-year-old went on to win the tournament — becoming the first two-time winner on the tour in 2019 — and later apologised for losing his temper.On Tuesday, Kim kneeled in front of television cameras as he fought back tears and apologised again after attending an emergency KPGA meeting over his action.But the KPGA later said it had reached a unanimous decision to suspend the golfer for three years from the Korean tour with a fine of 10 million won (US$8,350).“Kim Bi-o damaged the dignity of a golfer with etiquette violation and inappropriate behaviour,” it said in a statement.Kim leads the tour in money and Player of the Year points, but the suspension means he will not be able to finish the season.Kim, who has six professional wins to his name, played on the US PGA Tour in 2011 after earning his place via Q-SChool. He also had two seasons on the second-tier Web.com tour.0Shares0000(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more


Kings look like road warriors in 7-0 romp

Posted On Jan 11 2020 by

first_imgSUNRISE, Fla. – The unexpected happened when the NHL’s worst road team visited one of the league’s best home teams. Sean Burke made 40 saves for his 38th career shutout and Alexander Frolov and Michael Cammalleri each scored twice to help the Kings beat the Florida Panthers 7-0 on Saturday night. Konstantin Pushkarev, Dustin Brown and Jamie Lundmark also scored for the Kings, who had dropped seven of their previous eight road games. Frolov, Cammalleri, Sean Avery and Derek Armstrong each had two assists. “We haven’t had a lot of problems scoring goals this year. It’s been keeping them out that’s been the biggest problem,” Kings coach Marc Crawford said. “Sean’s come in and taken that burden away from us, and it has given us a better feel for our team.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img Burke, who turned 40 on Monday, was claimed off waivers from Tampa Bay on Jan. 18. It was his first shutout since April 8, 2006, vs. Pittsburgh. “When the game’s kind of out of reach, and you get down to the last four or five minutes, you think about the shutout,” Burke said. “It’s such a good thing for the team.” The Kings scored six goals on 18 shots through two periods. last_img read more


‘I want Ronaldo to pick up girls for me!’ Man United fan Rhydian takes the talkSPORT Q&A

Posted On Jan 6 2020 by

first_imgEach week throughout the season, thanks to our mates @shootmusic, we’re asking top musicians for their thoughts on the beautiful game. In the hot-seat this week, classical superstar Rhydian…What’s your favourite talkSPORT Show and why? Full Contact with Brian Moore. I love Brian Moore’s commentary.talkSPORT gives you your own show, what’s it’s called and what’s it about? Refs and Umpires. I want to hear them talking about their careers, how they got into it, their best and worst moments, embarrassing moments, etc.Who are the greatest football team in the land? Manchester United. People often ask me why I don’t support a Welsh team but that’s simple. If I support Cardiff everyone one from Swansea would hate me and vice versa! They are tribal wars I don’t want to be a part of. Who is the most rock ‘n’ roll player playing the beautiful game right now? Gareth Bale.If you were put in charge of the pre-match entertainment for the FA Cup final at Wembley, what band do you want playing live? I’d have Prince perform there.Who’s gonna sing the National Anthem? I’m biased, but I should sing the National Anthem. I know how to deliver passion in an anthemic fashion!What track are the players walking down the tunnel and onto the pitch to? Nessun DormaWhat’s on the stereo in the dressing room to psyche the players up? The Sex Pistols album, Never mind the B******s. It’s either that or a bit of Eminem.You build your own rock ‘n’ roll five-a-side team. Who’s in? Serge from Kasabian, Robbie Williams, Susan Boyle (in goal) Dizzee Rascal and Rod Stewart.You get to pick one footballer to work as your roadie. Who is it and what do you have them doing? Cristiano Ronaldo. He’ll attract the girls over after the shows  What’s going on with you as an artist at the moment? My new album ‘One Day Like This’ has been at the top of the classical charts for ten weeks and I am about to embark on my UK solo tour. 1 Rhydian last_img read more


Premier League team of the weekend: Arsenal, Man United and Chelsea stars shine

Posted On Dec 30 2019 by

first_img 11 Goalkeeper: Artur Boruc (Bournemouth) – to find out who else makes the team of the week, just click right – It’s fair to say the Polish shotstopper isn’t the safest pair of hands in the Premier League, but he put on quite a show to shut out Leicester City on Saturday as the Cherries, who had a man sent off, grabbed a 0-0 draw. Boruc made some key saves in the match and kept out Riyad Mahrez’s penalty too. Central midfield: Mark Noble (West Ham) – This was a classic all-action display from the Hammers star as he helped his side to a 2-0 victory over Liverpool. Five tackles, six interceptions and two clearances show his defensive work and his cross for Andy Carroll’s goal was sublime too. Centre forward: Diego Costa (Chelsea) – The beast is back. He actually looked like he wanted play football and got himself a goal and an assist, cutely cutting the ball back to Oscar for the first goal of the game. Centre back: Laurent Koscielny (Arsenal) – The Gunners’ Premier League title challenge remains on course and it’s thanks to the Frenchman’s goal against Newcastle. He sat out Arsenal’s win over Bournemouth following Arsenal’s 4-0 defeat to Southampton but bounced back with a towering performance at the back to keep out the Magpies. Winger: Michail Antonio (West Ham United) – Up until December, you could be forgiven for forgetting the winger had made a £7million move to Upton Park in the summer. He’s making up for lost time though, getting an assist and two goals in his last three games. His tackle, run, and diving header for the Hammers’ opener against Liverpool showed he has great all-round ability and could be a great asset for Slaven Bilic for the rest of the season. 11 11 11 Centre back: James Collins (West Ham) – You would have been forgiven for thinking the Welsh defender was surplus to requirements at Upton Park after they landed Juventus star Angelo Ogbonna but the 32-year-old star has hit back and was a star performer against Liverpool, keeping Christian Benteke firmly tucked up in his pocket. In the crazy world of the Premier League, the weekend had a sense of normality about it, for a change.Chelsea looked confident as they crushed Crystal Palace, Manchester United squeaked past Swansea with Wayne Rooney reminding us of his class, while Arsenal delivered a 1-0 win over Newcastle.West Brom boss Tony Pulis proudly taught his old side Stoke a lesson, and Jermain Defoe grabbed a double to hand Sunderland an important victory over a listless Aston Villa.But who were the stars over the ten games? Check out our Premier League team of the weekend by clicking the right arrow above… Centre back: Toby Alderweireld (Tottenham) – The Belgian is consistently excellent for Spurs and put on another exceptional performance on Sunday against Everton. Romelu Lukaku was often found moving towards Jan Vertonghen as he was unable to get any change out of his compatriot. As well as his defending, Alderweireld also hit a magnificent long pass to Dele Alli, which the youngster was able to control and fire home to get Spurs back level. 11 11 Winger: Anthony Martial (Manchester United) – The Frenchman had gone a little quiet since he burst onto the scene in September but he played well in the Red Devils’ victory over Swansea, scoring a goal and making an assist. 11 11 11 11 11 Centre forward: Jermain Defoe (Sunderland) – The goals haven’t come as naturally as they used to for the 33-year-old during his time at the Stadium of Light but he gave the relegation battlers a massive boost with a brace against fellow strugglers Aston Villa. Central midfield: John Obi Mikel (Chelsea) – Out of favour with Jose Mourinho, the Nigerian has been brought back into the team by Guus Hiddink and was superb in the clash with Crystal Palace. His game was simple yet effective as he completed 78 of his 82 passes and mopped up in front of the back four. Central midfield: Alexander Tettey (Norwich City) – The Norway international is usually seen collecting yellow cards (eight so far this season), rather than scoring goals but he’s now hit two in four games to hand the Canaries two important wins. He’s a vital component of Alex Neil’s team and will be key if they are to survive the threat of relegation. last_img read more